Athlete Spotlight: Chase Wetterling

Senior+Chase+Wetterling+is+one+of+Simpson+College%E2%80%99s+two-sport+athletes.+The+criminal+justice+major+plays+football+as+well+as+track+and+field.+Photo+courtesy+of+Ruthi+Wheatley
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Athlete Spotlight: Chase Wetterling

Senior Chase Wetterling is one of Simpson College’s two-sport athletes. The criminal justice major plays football as well as track and field. Photo courtesy of Ruthi Wheatley

Senior Chase Wetterling is one of Simpson College’s two-sport athletes. The criminal justice major plays football as well as track and field. Photo courtesy of Ruthi Wheatley

Senior Chase Wetterling is one of Simpson College’s two-sport athletes. The criminal justice major plays football as well as track and field. Photo courtesy of Ruthi Wheatley

Senior Chase Wetterling is one of Simpson College’s two-sport athletes. The criminal justice major plays football as well as track and field. Photo courtesy of Ruthi Wheatley

by Gunnar Davis, Sports Editor

Graduating: May 2019

Hometown: Melcher-Dallas, Iowa

Major: Criminal Justice

Sports: Football, Track and Field

Why did you choose Simpson?

It’s close to home. They allowed me the opportunity to continue my athletic career. One thing I really noticed is the coaching staff. They made me feel like I was at home. They were straightforward, honest and I felt like they were going to put their time into me.

What is the hardest part about being a two-sport athlete?

It’s hard for me to say because I’ve only ever played two sports. I see my football teammates and my track teammates that just do the one sport getting the work in and putting the time in—it never really stops, but as a dual-sport athlete, you’re always in that intense season. There’s never time off. I think the hardest part is just the toll it’s taken on my body.

You’ve had some injuries too, correct?

Yes. I dealt with my first serious injury at nationals my sophomore year in the open 400. Come to find out I tore my adductors in my groin and that required a procedure that put me out of the following year in football. I also had a grade two injury in my PCL my senior year of football in the first game. Basically, I tore my PCL but not completely. I sat out for four weeks, but unfortunately, I’m not a patient person, so I might’ve gotten back into it a little quick.

What kept you motivated to stay out for both sports while dealing with injuries?

It’s got to be my teammates. Football is obviously a very big team sport. Over four years, I got to know these guys, and I’m good friends with them. With track, it’s the exact same thing. My teammates are my brothers, and I felt like I had a role to play. I felt like if I wasn’t there to play that role, I’d let them down.

What would your advice be to a freshman just starting a sport?

Don’t quit. You’ve got to stick with it. I mean, it’s really easy to give up on something. It’s going to be hard. It’s very difficult to make that transition when you’re young. If you stick it out and you trust what you’re doing, trust yourself, and trust those around you, pretty soon you’re going to realize how fun it is. If you quit, you’ll regret it.

What’s the thing you’ll take away from Simpson for the rest of your life?

When I came here, our football team was not where it was now. Just being on the team and being part of the group, building it up and now we have a very successful program. Seeing Coach (Matt) Jeter come in and change the culture, seeing how people work hard — that’s one thing I’ll take away. It’s the same with track. To be able to compete with my guys, be on the same team as them, see them grow. It’s something I’ll take away for the rest of my life.

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